Animal Defenders International

 

Animal Defenders International

ADI slates companies using performing animals

Posted: 8 February 2007

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When performing animals appear on our TV screens or in newspapers or magazines, many assume that ‘someone’ is looking after the welfare of the animals. Those who book animals for their promotions believe that their responsibility begins and ends with what happens on the set. However as ADI’s investigations have shown, it is what happens before (long before) the animal arrives on set that is important. This is where the actual training takes place, and where welfare is often compromised.

It is not only physical punishment or withdrawal of food or water that encourages animals to perform. The trainer is often the sole source of contact, approval and affection as well and this power can be used to make the animal comply. ADI has also provided video evidence of physical and emotional punishment in training of animals.

Our campaign has taken aim at some of the world’s major brands such as Toyota, Diageo, D&G, Barclaycard, Sony Ericsson, Homechoice as well as the UK Government’s Revenue & Customs.

ADI investigates all adverts that we are alerted to where animals are featured and writes to the companies involved as well as condemning their irresponsible actions in the media.

February 2006

Toyota used 52-year old Anne, the UK’s last remaining circus elephant, in their advertising campaign to promote the Toyota Yaris car model. ADI’s condemnation was covered in Lifestyle extra online, Mad.co.uk, Brand Republic, Scottish Daily Mail, Liverpool Echo, Marketing Week, Green Consumer Guide.

May 2006

Unilever’s run of ads to promote it’s ‘Sure Sport’ deodorant product used nine living animals; three chimps, one bison, two bears, one hyena, one mandrill and one orang-utan to make their ad called ‘Go Wild’. Computer-generated images (CGI) were also used to show a total of 300 animal images on the screen. ADI wrote to the company and its agency; Brand Republic covered the story.

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May 2006

The GMB Union hired a live camel to stage a protest against AA owners’ Permira and CVC outside a London church. The camel, called Teifet, is 30 years old and had to endure nearly six hours of travel in addition to the three-hour event itself. ADI wrote to GMB; the story was covered by The Independent, Independent Online, ePolitix.

June 2006

The last two Saab convertible TV ads have used wild animals to promote the car manufacturer’s 93 and 95 models. A European Lynx was used in the Saab-95 ad and a Brown bear and two ferrets used in the Saab 93 ad. ADI wrote to Saab; the story appeared on Mad.co.uk and Petsmiles.com.

June 2006

Abbey used six squirrels in their ‘family ISA’ TV advertisement even though in the same advert they created CGI squirrels to act out parts of the script. ADI wrote to the company; story appeared in ePolitixPlus and Brand Republic.

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July 2006

Coca Cola’s campaign ‘What Goes Around, Comes Around’ featuring a ringnecked Parakeet. ADI wrote to Coca Cola; Marketing magazine featured the story.

Computer-generated imagery (CGI)

CGI techniques are so advanced now that it is almost impossible to tell the computer-generated animals apart from real animals. And furthermore, audiences do not care to see real animals. Thus, there is no excuse for the continued use of performing animals in the advertising, TV and film industries.

HOW YOU CAN HELP:

  • Tell us if you see an advert featuring an animal, and we will investigate.
  • Boycott the products and services of the brands that use animals.
  • Write to the companies; tell them what you are doing and why.
  • Send us copies of any correspondence you receive from them.

Stop Circus Suffering: join the gobal campaign to end the abuse of animals.

© Animal Defenders International 2018