Animal Defenders International

 

Animal Defenders International

ADI hails Sydney council ban as victory for circus animals

Posted: 19 June 2006

Animal Defenders International (ADI), who initiated a global ‘Stop Circus Suffering’ campaign 10 years ago, welcomes Parramatta City Council’s ban of animal circuses. Last week the Sydney council voted unanimously to prevent circuses operating on its land, claiming that the use of wild animals for human entertainment was inappropriate.

ADI has been campaigning to end the suffering of animals in traveling circuses for over a decade and has successfully launched campaigns in Europe in the UK, Ireland, Norway, Portugal and Greece; in the USA and in Chile, South America, with launches to follow in Peru, Colombia, Brazil and Bolivia this year. As a result wild circus animal bans have been enforced in Austria, Croatia in 28 towns, UK in around 200 local authorities and Greece in the towns of Malia, Thessaloniki and Patras. Both the UK and Scottish Parliaments have also now committed to ban wild animals in travelling circuses.

ADI Chief Executive Jan Creamer says: “Throughout the world our ‘Stop Circus Suffering’ campaign has opened people’s eyes to the suffering of circus animals. We have seen almost all UK animal circuses close and the industry is in decline across Europe. We applaud Parramatta City Council’s efforts to achieve this result”.

The ban signals the end of an era for one of Australia’s oldest circuses, the Lennon Bros Circus, which has been touring through the region with seven lions, including four cubs, ponies and dogs for more than 113 years. It will also affect a sister circus, Stardust, which features five lions, and elephants. They are among the few remaining circuses in Australia that have exotic animals such as monkeys, lions and elephants.

Parramatta’s Lord Mayor David Borger said the decision was in response to local objections to the use of wild animals in live entertainment. “The community doesn’t think it’s appropriate that we have lions and tigers sitting on the backs of trucks on Parramatta Rd as they’re transported across town,” he said.
Stardust Circus manager Jan Lennon countered that its performances were well attended, with audience of around 500 a night. “Our animals are happy. The circus is the only life they know, and they’re treated very well,".

_____________________________ENDS _____________________________

  • Both the UK and Scottish Parliaments have now committed to ban certain wild animals in travelling circuses. Approximately 200 local authorities in the UK have banned all animal acts on council land.
  • In Europe Austria has banned wild animals in circuses and 28 Croatian towns have followed suit. A six-year campaign by ADI secured new regulations in over 160 countries concerning the cross border movements of endangered species with animal circuses.
  • ADI has circus campaigns currently running in Europe in the UK, Ireland, Norway, Portugal and Greece; in the USA and in Chile, South America, with launches to follow in Peru, Colombia, Brazil and Bolivia this year. Our evidence has been used in Costa Rica and Singapore to secure national prohibitions on the use of wild animals in circuses.
  • ADI has rescued and relocated a number of circus animals including: lions, tigers, horses, dogs, a python and chimpanzees.

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